October 24th, 2008

turtle

Greenwood, COCAINE BLUES

Another badgermirlacca rec that turned out well!

Kerry Greenwood, Cocaine Blues (Phryne Fisher Mysteries): a very fun mystery set in Australia in the late 1920s. The heroine, Phryne Fisher, has multiple talents and quite a lot of money, and goes to investigate the daughter of acquaintances, at their request, because she's bored. She quickly becomes involved in what looks like two mysteries, and ends up with a maid and two cab drivers and various other friends, of whom my favorite was a woman doctor. The tone is very light and suited to the period. I'm definitely getting more of these.
turtle

Color-coding in fantasy poll

Poll #1284658 Color-coding

The setting of a fantasy novel is a country whose people are brown. There's an Evil Empire (tm) nearby. What color are the people in the Evil Empire (tm)?

also brown
19(42.2%)
darker
1(2.2%)
paler
13(28.9%)
unspecified
8(17.8%)
feathered or otherwise nonhuman
4(8.9%)

The heroine is a brown person, native to the setting; the hero is an outsider, formerly oppressed by the Evil Empire (tm). The hero's color is

brown
13(29.5%)
darker
3(6.8%)
paler
8(18.2%)
mixed race
15(34.1%)
feathered or otherwise nonhuman
5(11.4%)

When I write fantasy, I think about the color of the various characters.

Yes.
22(50.0%)
No.
4(9.1%)
Sometimes.
16(36.4%)
I don't think it matters.
1(2.3%)
I don't want to say.
1(2.3%)

I think character color in fantasy novels is linked with real-world issues.

Yes, we can't help but make connections.
19(42.2%)
No, it's just fantasy, their color doesn't matter.
2(4.4%)
Sometimes; I'm not sure.
1(2.2%)
It's better fantasy if we try to disrupt the real-world connections.
8(17.8%)
It depends how closely the fantasy world mirrors ours in other respects.
13(28.9%)
I'm still thinking about this issue.
2(4.4%)
I commented below.
0(0.0%)

My favorite fantasy novel with non-white people is: